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Our Story

La nostra Storia

We started to create ceramic master pieces in 1968. History of ceramics and our story are deeply connected, thanks to our Capodimonte products, best in quality, uniqueness and with distinct design. It is a family owned company,with a branch in the USA. Our originality is our success.

If there is in Italy a kind of china that is universally loved and known, this is certainly the one of Capodimonte: delightful statuettes bursting with life and popular grace but, above all, the highly delicate roses, are a real wonder of lightness.

Today, some of the followers of this very special style pass down the secret of these gentle flowers in their works, giving us unexpected springs.

The firm Ceramiche Devis is based in Nove, in the Vicenza province, the town where Bassano ceramics was born. Yet, the ultralight Neapolitan style must have really conquered the firm, which treasures the inheritance of ancient master craftsmen and at the same time has revived it with technical innovations introduced over years of work. Now the enterprise successfully operates on the European and non-European market, offering a wide range of products for furnishing the home: basket, vases, candelabra, mirrors, lamps, tea-sets…

And the most fascinating activity of the firm is just the creation of flowers in the Capodimonte style, handcrafted by most skilful “florist” who have handed down all the secrets of the trade from generation to generation. Expert hands create this impalpable delicacy and succeed in keeping production costs at a medium-low level.

La storia di Nove

Many different factors have favoured the establishment and the development of ceramics arts in Nove since the eighteenth century. Among these, the presence underground of plastic clay and china clay and the possibility of using the Brenta river both to transfer finished products and wood for kilns and to set in motion, with its hydraulic power, the mills used to mix the bodies and mill the stones found in that same river.

In the eighteenth century the growing demand and diffusion in Europe of the precious Chinese porcelain led Dutch ceramists to imitate their manufacturing style, and their products invaded even the markets of Venice. The venetian senate tried to solve this situation by encouraging domestic production granting tax rebates for those who produced porcelain and managed to improve majolica. That was a favourable moment for Giovanni Battista Antonibon who opened in 1727 in the old house of his father in Nove what would become the most important ceramics factory of the Venetian Republic.

In 1732 the Manifattura Antonibon was offered by The Senate the privilege of being exempt from all taxes for twenty years. Pasquale Antonibon, who succeeded his father in the business in 1738, accomplished another important goal in 1762: porcelain production. In that same years (1770) earthenware became widespread in Italy. Earthenware is a type of body that was produced in England already in 1725. This product, thanks to its whiteness and low cost had become an unexpected competitor of Italian majolica and porcelain. Once again the Manifattura Antonibon, led by Giò Maria Baccin, managed in 1768 to obtain a body that was an almost perfect imitation of the English one.

In the eighteenth century the growing demand and diffusion in Europe of the precious Chinese porcelain led Dutch ceramists to imitate their manufacturing style and their products invaded even the markets of Venice. The Venetian Senate tried to solve this situation by encouraging domestic production with tax rebates for those who produced porcelain and managed to improve majolica. That was a favourable moment for Giovanni Battista Antonibon who opened in 1727 in the old house of his father in Nove what would become the most important ceramics factory of the Venetian republic. Pasquale Antonibon, who succeeded to his father in the business, accomplished anther important goal in 1762: porcelain production. In 1770 earthenware became widespread in Italy. Earthenware is a type of body that, thanks to its whiteness and low cost had become an unexpected competitor of Italian majolica and porcelain. Once again the Antonibon factory, with Giò Maria Baccin, managed in 1786 to obtain a body that was an almost perfect imitation of the English one.

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, despite the serious political and economical crisis, some manufacturing companies from Nove managed to prosper thanks to earthenware. They gave up the luxury production for the now impoverished aristocrats and addressed the large public, and less wealthy people. New subject and techniques were developed for this new customers: this is how popular ceramics was born.

Towards 1860-1865 another genre was introduced, called the Artistic or courtly or the new rococo. This genre was perhaps devised for the need to compete with foreign countries at International Exhibitions. In the first years of 1900 the Nove Arts Institute marked the end of the nineteenth century’s heritage and the introduction of the twentieth century style.